Monthly Archives: September 2015

An Argument for Sustained Silent Reading

I’ve been thinking a lot about Sustained Silent Reading after reading Amber Chandler’s brilliant, reflective post for Middle Web on the subject. I’ve been struggling with the question of “should I give up class time for independent reading?” for the … Continue reading

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I love “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Here’s why I’d rather not teach it:

Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird is a foundational text in the American canon that attempts to deal with the complex issues of race and discrimination in the United States. Set in the Great Depression, this … Continue reading

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Alternatives to the Answer Key

I’ve been perusing teacher resources on a few teaching websites and am admittedly mystified by the number of secondary English resources that contain answer keys. In my own lessons, I think about target responses that I want for some questions, … Continue reading

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The Politics of a Sign

How does your school use signs to establish boundaries? What do these signs say about our students (and us)? When I was at Amherst College last summer for a NEH seminar, I was impressed when our tour guide told us … Continue reading

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Teachers: 3 Simple Ideas for Staying Healthy

Here are three changes that I made to keep myself healthy and more energetic: Get a water bottle. Keep it by your side at all times. Refill throughout the day. (Healthy-ish) snack drawer: Keep a supply of energy bars, herbal … Continue reading

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Peer Review As You Like It

Flexible peer review gives students more choice; it treats them like real writers who are in tune with their own writing process. When I told a group of my Mass Media & Society students last semester that it was “peer … Continue reading

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The Grading Question: Responding to Concerns

It’s fall again. School has started, yellow buses are on the roads, and thousands of students across the country are watching their averages plummet because they skipped an assignment, or turned in their homework late. If you’re a teacher who … Continue reading

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