Monthly Archives: October 2015

Thinking Out Loud: What if Universities Harnessed the Power of K-12 Teachers?

Student bodies at universities are more diverse than ever. Students who fill lecture halls increasingly come from disadvantaged backgrounds, and have a variety of learning needs. Even so, many universities decline to question the idea that a Ph.D. from an … Continue reading

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Wish List: “Heart of Darkness” by Joseph Conrad

I regret that I haven’t had the chance to teach Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a labyrinthine text rich in political, historical and social meaning. During a graduate seminar, I co-planned and delivered a unit on Conrad’s novella – but … Continue reading

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Application Season is Here & “Undermatching” is Still a Problem

I teach at a rural secondary school where more than half of the students qualify for a free or reduced lunch. My students are like those at every other school: They’re caring, hard-working, and want bright futures for themselves.  Many … Continue reading

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What enrollment in an online class has taught me about online learning

There’s lots of incentive to phone it in: In a regular face-to-face class, the instructor needs to show up. And do something. If the instructor isn’t physically there, the students know that something is wrong. They can, and will, advocate … Continue reading

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When we say “collaboration,” are we talking about the same thing?

I keep hearing people talking about their collaboration — on Twitter with their PLN and in Professor Learning Communities (PLCs). I’m beginning to wonder if we’re all talking about the same thing when we say “collaboration.” After all, collaboration is … Continue reading

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